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Teviothead 3/10/20

Results from a damp Teviothead today are HERE

Routegadget HERE

Hope everyone enjoyed themselves today (despite the weather) – from the comments I received it sounds like folk were just glad to be back competing.

My plan was to not have a conventional course for the green – more middle-distance/relay style planning with lots of controls (it wasn’t a coincidence that it ended up as 19!) and changes of direction. I also wanted to try and use the best bits of the area with all the lovely wiggly brown lines – hence the reason for the 1,7500 scale. This also tends to be the bit with the best underfoot conditions.

Light-Green was perhaps more conventional although with a lot of similar legs – a consequence of being limited to 25 controls. Leg 16-17 on Green seems to have caught a few people out – a deceptively tricky leg, made all the more difficult by control 120 on Light-Green pulling the unsuspecting off-line.

The observant among you may have noticed several control sites which were used in my devious Photo O challenge from earlier in the year. The “memorial” at 117 was my attempt at some light hearted humour in this time of gloom – I hope it didn’t put you off!

John Tullie (Planner/Organiser)

Teviothead event

Our first post-Covid event is at Teviothead, courtesy of John Tullie. This event is for members only to help familiarise ourselves with the new procedures. Club members have been emailed with the information.

Strictly NO entry on the day for anyone.

Postbox O

Another exercise for those of you in the larger towns. Pauline has made up some maps where the controls are postboxes. Set your own target of say a 30 minute Score. Note that these courses aren’t part of an organised event so you take part at your own risk. Suitable for members and non-members. Take care crossing roads.

Links to the maps:

Gala A

Gala B

Hawick A

Hawick B

Kelso A

Kelso B

Melrose

MapRun courses

MapRun is an App which allows you to use your smartphone to enjoy orienteering without needing to set up physical control points on the ground. Reivers now have 7 local courses for folk (members and non-members) to enjoy.

Available courses:

  • Bowmont Forest, near Kelso (Easy Trail 4.7km course)
  • Bowmont Forest, near Kelso (Long course, Urban style i.e. only paths, rides, roads allowed)
  • Bowmont Forest, near Kelso (Shorter course, Urban style)
  • Gala Policies (Light Green course)
  • Hawick Town (All controls)
  • Hawick Town (8 controls)
  • Tweedbank (Orange, medium, urban course)
  • Wilton Park, Hawick (30 minute Score)

Go to HERE and towards the bottom of the page you’ll find some instructions then the list of available events, in alphabetical order, under that.

The App is called MapRunF. Once you’ve installed this it’ll find events near you automatically when you tap the “Events Near Me” button on your phone. Ideally you would print off the PDF and run using that to navigate but it’s also perfectly possible to just use the map on your phone.

There’s a short video of MapRunF HERE

Important: Note that these courses aren’t part of an organised event so you take part at your own risk. Take care crossing roads.

Elibank 29/2/20 – Results

The results from today’s event at Elibank are HERE

Planner/Organisers report from James Purves:

As an orienteer every time I have competed at Elibank I have found it very challenging both on navigation and fitness which is why it has been the venue for the Scottish Score Championships in 2018 and a Scottish Orienteering League 2016 event among others. Rough, steep, cold north-facing, hillside terrain, covered in mature coniferous and beech forest, with tiring deep, dead bracken hiding lots of fallen trees, branches and debris, plus the time of year, February, when the weather might be horrible played a large part in planning courses.
My task was to plan a small local event with three levels of difficulty: Yellow (easy, fun level to attract children and families); Orange (medium difficulty) and a Green course (hard navigation, physically difficult, to attract experienced orienteers). As there was a date clash with an ELO event at Butterdean Wood we didn’t expect huge numbers – in the end we ran out of maps!
Organising and planning an orienteering event needs assistance from several willing and enthusiastic helpers: Sam is a dab hand with the Condes maps and recced the courses beforehand with me, Judith helping put out higher up controls on the Friday and Saturday morning and mentor Ian Maxwell who checked and advised on the maps before printing and also ran the courses in the morning to “wake” the controls. Ian then did a well-attended coaching session on contours. Robin Sloan communicated with the different owners of Elibank forestry, private and Forestry and Land Scotland re permissions and access / risk whilst Lindsey Knox helped with registration and downloads, etc – the event couldn’t have happened so easily without everyone working together as a team. Thanks again to Rob, Robin and Ian for collecting controls at the end.

On the day we were lucky with the weather which deteriorated only after the event was finished. The Green course attracted a good turnout of 20 competitors from a range of clubs, with lots of positive feedback at the end and plenty mention of the 160 metre finish and gradient !

However it was very encouraging to see the large turnout of families with children who entered the Yellow and Orange courses – we should have had more maps as we ran out. Colin Williams had played a part in spreading the word about the event and it just shows the benefit of promotion. Orienteering must be the ultimate family sport where parents and children of all ages can take part together, in a sort of treasure hunt adventure, finding controls, climbing over fallen trees and scrambling up and down slippery grassy banks. Some enjoyed it so much they went back out and did another course! There were plenty happy faces at the finish and most of them, parents and children, said they would be keen to do it again.